Evil Eye Jewelry -Popular among Celebrities too!
2018/04/04

Evil Eye Jewelry -Popular among Celebrities too!

The Evil Eye Jewelry- The evil eye amulet has been worn in public by celebrities such as as Cameron Diaz, Kelly Ripa, Brad Pitt, Kim Kardashian, Lindsay Lohan, Lauren Conrad, and Rhianna. Clearly, this iconic and stylish image has only increased in popularity

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The evil eye. Chances are you have seen this famous symbol many times. You’ve probably even worn one and you’ve definitely seen someone wearing an evil eye amulet. You may have witnessed a person give the “evil eye” look (and you may have even given it yourself). But do you know the deep and meaningful history of the evil eye symbol, and do you know how popular and prevalent the evil eye is throughout a plethora of different cultures?

 

The symbol and superstition of the evil eye is one of the strongest symbolic images in the world. Yet, despite the differences in the cultures which hold the evil eye myth, it retains largely the same meaning no matter where the story is told.

The evil eye is thought of as a look given to inflict harm, suffering, or some form of bad luck on those that it is cast upon. It is a look which clearly states that one intends for something bad to happen to the object of one’s focus, either out of jealousy or pure malice. The superstition of the evil eye holds that the malicious look is powerful enough to bring about actual disaster for the unfortunate person that is the receiver of the glare

The evil eye is a powerful superstition in India. Hinduism preaches that the eye is the most powerful point at which the body can give off energy. Thus, a strong fear of an “evil” look from the eye makes sense; the evil eye holds enormous powers. The Hindus fear that even an “admirable” eye can bring about ill luck, resulting in the supply of milk from cows drying up (again, this idea dates back to the fear of undue praise, first warned against in Greece). In fact, the Hindus will offer the “admiring” glancer a bowl of milk to counteract the threat of the evil eye.

The Hindus believe that jealousy is at the root of the power of the evil eye, whether in the form of a malicious or admirable look. Interestingly, the Hindus teach that the times of change in life--as in during puberty, marriage, or childbirth--one is most vulnerable to the threat of the evil eye.

In South America, Brazil holds a superstition equivalent to the evil eye known as the “fat eye.” Compliments which are sincere are not feared to cause the evil eye to attack as in other countries, but insincere compliments are thought to put one at stake.

In Europe, the myth of the evil eye also originated with the idea that envious or malicious looks had the power to bring about bad luck. The largest source of the evil eye was believed to be witches. Yet those with eye colors which were rare were also seen as powerful possessors of the evil eye look. For instance, Germans feared those with red eyes. In Ireland, those with squinty eyes were feared to be evil eye sorcerers. In Italy, the unibrow was another sign that one would cast an evil eye.

The fear of the evil eye did not carry over to America, except in the form of a metaphor. While the superstition is not intense enough to take precaution, the evil eye is seen as impolite, and a warning that the source of the evil eye has bad intentions.

Methods of Protection against the Evil Eye

Phrases and rituals are not the only way to protect against the power of the evil eye. The most popular method of escaping the evil eye’s effects in many cultures is by the use of evil eye talismans, evil eye symbols, and evil eye jewelry. These are meant to “reflect” the power of the evil look. The evil eye amulet originated in Greece, where it was known as an “apotropaic” amulet, meaning that it reflected harm. The most basic design of the evil eye, prevalent in the Middle East, is a talisman designed with concentric blue and white circles made to symbolize the evil eye, known as the nazar. It is often used on houses, vehicles, or jewelry.

One of the most powerful examples of the evil eye amulet in the Middle East and Africa is the Hamsa, also known as the “Hand of Fatima.” The hamsa is a hand-shaped symbol with the evil eye on the palm. The hamsa can be used in wallpaper or jewelry to ward off the evil eye. The hamsa is also found in Jewish culture, where it is known as the “Hand of God" or the "Hand of Miriam.” The popularity of Kabbalah has revived the hamsa and influenced its presence in jewelry and design.

The Evil Eye in Modern Life

The evil eye still has powerful influence in modern life, pop culture, and even jewelry and design. Who is not familiar with the phrase “the evil eye,” or thought to have caught someone casting it their way at least once or twice before? In Turkey, the Evil Eye is ingrained in every day life and has deep symbolism throughout the culture. The Evil Eye pendant is affixed to anything that is perceived to attract greed, envy, or ill-will. In Turkey, you will find the Evil Eye symbol on currency, in homes and offices, hanging from the necks of newborn children and farm animals, and in the foundations of buildings.

Evil Eye Jewelry

The evil eye is an extremely popular piece in jewelry design at the moment. In recent years many celebrities, ranging from Madonna, Britney Spears, The Olsen Twins, Mick Jagger, and Nicole Richie (just to name a few) have been photographed wearing red Kabbalah bracelets, which are thought to be another method of protection against the evil eye. The evil eye amulet has been worn in public by celebrities such as as Cameron Diaz, Kelly Ripa, Brad Pitt, Kim Kardashian, Lindsay Lohan, Lauren Conrad, and Rhianna. Clearly, this iconic and stylish image has only increased in popularity.



Article edited from https://www.jewishgiftplace.com/What-is-the-Evil-Eye.html